EVENTS | Gifted Workshops

We’ve had a busy summer here at Gifted, hosting workshops across the UK. Attendance at the five sessions was high, with participators ranging from churches and theatres to museums and arts institutions.

“Many thanks for the workshop yesterday. I found it really interesting and thought provoking”.

Our first four sessions, held in Leeds, Peterborough, Stratford-upon-Avon and London, focused on ‘Understanding the Heritage Lottery Fund’, and aimed to answer key questions and concerns about HLF funding, whilst giving a comprehensive overview of what it takes to deliver a successful application. We also engaged our partner architects for the process  – Paul Vick Architects and Stephen Oliver Architecture – who provided specialist insight into the architectural side of HLF projects. It was incredibly interesting for us to meet such a range of different organisations and hear about the transformational development projects that are being planned across the country.

“Detailed and specific advice was delivered in a short space of time by knowledgeable speakers”.

We were honoured to be asked to partner with the National Churches Trust for our final workshop of the summer, ‘Transforming donations into gifts’. Held in London, this event focused on the art of effectively asking for money. We addressed the subtle yet important difference between a ‘donation’ and a ‘gift’, and worked through the five key steps that are critical in securing the highest level of gifts possible and maximising fundraising potential.

“Very clear and well-delivered with excellent content”.

 Gifted will be holding further workshops in the coming months and throughout 2017, both with the National Churches Trust and with our partner architects and other specialists. To register your interest in receiving an invitation please do get in touch. If you need advice on your organisation’s fundraising challenge now, please contact one of our Directors who would be happy to have an informal initial conversation about your needs.

 

 

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